Egypt’s iconic Sphinx had a ‘distinctive astronomical’ moment with sun during equinox

Egypt Ministry of Antiquities reportedly said on March 19 that the Sphinx had a “distinctive astronomical” moment with the sun during the spring equinox when, in a shining flourish, the sunset on the shoulder of the half-man, half-lion statue. The Ministry reportedly said that the rare phenomenon happens twice a year during the spring in March and the fall equinox in September. It is believed that the earth’s axis does not point toward or away from the sun, during the equinox which means that the Northern and Southern hemispheres receive equal amounts of sunlight. In addition, it means the day and night are equal in length. READ: Secret Chamber: Archaeologists Find Opening Decorated With Centaurs And A Sphinx Inside Nero’s Palace In Rome. Pictures Inside The iconic half-man, half-lion is carved out of limestone bedrock. The Sphinx is also strategically placed for the summer solstice in June, when the sun sets between the pyramids of pharaohs Khufu and Khafre, as per reports. As per reports, the Sphinx’s position during the equinoxes and summer solstice suggests that the ancient Egyptians purposefully positioned the hybrid lion-man statue. Pedestal S...

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© 1996-2015 National Geographic Society, © 2015- 2019 National Geographic Partners, LLC. All rights reserved A bear at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center outside Yellowstone tests a bear-proof garbage container—important for making sure bears don’t get too comfortable coming to town to eat. Sow 101, a grizzly bear, has had a long and productive life. In her first 20 years, she ranged between Yellowstone National Park and the wild lands outside West Yellowstone, Montana, raising somewhere between three and four sets of cubs. She was the 101st grizzly to get a GPS collar as part of a National Park Service study—hence her name. But then, in the early ‘90s, she began eating garbage and pet food that had been carelessly left out by residents in a suburb north of town. Because of the risk of conflict with humans, wildlife officials relocated her deeper into the park. There she happily remained—for a while. Ten years later, however, there was a drought in Yellowstone, and food became scarce. Sow 101 sought out the place she’d come to learn, a decade earlier, had reliable food: the suburbs. So Sow 101 and her two cubs began eating people’s garbage and pet food once again. Afte...