First graders at North Bend Elementary in Baltimore get surprise donation of new bicycles from craft beer maker

The first graders at North Bend Elementary/Middle School in West Baltimore couldn’t help fidgeting as they sat in a line in the school’s parking lot Wednesday morning. And for good reason. Across from them stood a fleet of 52 new red bicycles and helmets — one for each of them — a surprise donation from the Can’d Aid Foundation, the charity arm of Canarchy, a national craft brewing collective that includes Oskar Blues, Cigar City, Deep Ellum and others. “You guys are up for a really special treat,” Principal Patricia Burrell told the 6- and 7-year-olds. “Who do you think is getting these bikes?” Alyssa Lile, the foundation’s outreach coordinator, asked them. A collective squeal of joy erupted, followed by chaos as each child received their new bike and helmet. The bikes were among more than 2,000 that Can’d Aid has donated to elementary school students in the past five years through its “Towns, Tunes, Treads + Trails” charitable program. Canarchy put aside $1 per sale for two months this summer to pay for the bicycles. Baltimore beer distributor Legends Limited sells beers from Canarchy brands in the central Maryland region. North Bend was the first Maryland school to be select...

Colnago has today launched the E64, an e-assisted version of that resembles the C64, the Italian

Colnago has today launched the E64, an e-assisted version of that resembles the C64, the Italian brand’s latest race bike. The E64 is built around an Ebikemotion motor, which can deliver up to 250 watts of assistance. This is a hub-based system, which is connected to a battery that is stored in the down tube. An additional external auxiliary battery can be added to boost range. The motor is controlled by a button that is moulded into the top of the top tube just behind the head tube. This system is also used in Orbea’s Gain e-road bike. We rode a prototype version of this system back in 2017 and found it quite intuitive to use. The whole system is claimed to weigh 3.7kg, bringing the total claimed weight of the bike to 12kg in an unspecified size. Despite its looks, the bike doesn’t actually use the same lugged tube-to-tube construction as the C64 — the frame is just painted to mimic the Colnago’s signature construction method. With that said, unless you’re looking closely, it’s honestly hard to differentiate the E64 from a regular non-assisted bike. Pricing and availability information was not available at the time of writing but we’ll update this story as soon as we have this...