Subscribe today to gain access to the every Research Intelligencer article we publish as well as the exclusive daily newsletter, full access to The MediaPost Cases, first-look research and daily insights from Joe Mandese, Editor in Chief. Google this week confirmed that it plans to make it easier for users of the most popular browser in the country to prevent tracking by ad-tech companies. The company plans to offer a new mechanism in Chrome that will enable consumers to block third-party cookies — meaning cookies set by ad-tech companies, including Google’s own DoubleClick — while preserving the first-party cookies that remember usernames and passwords. Chrome’s new feature will not operate by default, which probably means only the most privacy-conscious consumers will use the tool. Of course, much could depend on how clearly Google advertises and explains the cookie-blocking mechanism to consumers.  Regardless, the concept that users should be able to control the cookies on their devices is hardly new. On the contrary, web users have always been able to delete cookies that store the kind of information relied on by ad companies. But doing so can requir...